YOU’RE ALWAYS WELCOME AT BROOKLYN COMPREHENSIVE CARE CENTER

QUALITY MEDICAL CARE YOU CAN TRUST

 

Personalized Care and Guidance

SERVICES
Nurse Talking to Patient

WHO WE ARE

A Happier, Healthier You

Multi-specialty group of physicians including internist, family practitioners and pediatrician. Our physicians are board certified. We also have on staff social worker, physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech therapist and complete psycho-social evaluation for our patients.

Family care physician who will take care of entire family.

Chart & Stethoscope

SPECILIATY CARE CLINIC

Here For You

Fully equipped laboratory and vaccination

Preventive Medicine including vaccination

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Yearly physical examination with complete blood work.

Internal medicine- cardiovascular disease, diabetes,

Musculoskeletal pathology, pathology of internal organs.

Neurology - stroke and its complications, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, naturopathic pain, pathology of peripheral nervous system. Multiple sclerosis, Vertigo, gait abnormalities.

Ear- Nose -Throat (ENT) specialist will provide complete exam including audiometry and nosopharyngoscopy and we will successfully treat different kinds of upper airways pathology

.

Physical therapy- we successfully treat all kinds of musculoskeletal pathology

Occupational therapy - we will provide excellent care for stroke victims, patients with Alzheimer disease, memory impairment, and Parkinson disease.

Speech therapy- Speech pathology will get complete evaluation with consecutive treatment for children and adults.

Emergency Vehicles

OUR SPECIALISTS

Quality Care

Dr. Mayya Fasolya, M.D.

Family care physician

Dr. Arkady Shusterman M.D.

Internal Medicine

Dr. Leonid Goldin, M.D.

Internal Medicine

Glenn Muncher,

Speech Therapy

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Dr. Ankur Shah, M.D.

Cardiology

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Dr. Giridharan, S M.D.

Endocrinology

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Dr. Alexander Druker

Podiatry

 
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Гленн Манчер,

Логопед

LATEST NEWS IN MEDICINE
 

Written by Tim Snaith on February 5, 2021

The coronavirus pandemic dominated the headlines and our daily lives for most of the past year. Medical News Today have covered this fast-moving, complex story with live updates on the latest news, interviews with experts, and an ongoing investigation into the deep racial disparities that COVID-19 has helped unmask.

We have a varied selection of articles this week, beginning with news of the latest findings from the world’s largest ongoing study into nutrition. We also look back at phrenology, the once-popular, now discredited study of how the shape of the skull determines personality and behavior.

Written by Ana Sandoiu on February 3, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged the U.S. healthcare system in unprecedented ways. In a webinar hosted by the Commonwealth Fund, a nonprofit organization promoting health policy reform, experts look at some of the lessons that the new U.S. administration can learn from the pandemic.

The Commonwealth Fund — a nonprofit private organization dedicated to improving access to healthcare, particularly for more vulnerable groups — hosted a webinar discussing the steps that the new United States administration can take to achieve this goal.

The discussion featured experts from the organization’s Task Force on Payment and Delivery System Reform, and tackled how healthcare in the U.S. is organized, paid for, and delivered.

Short afternoon naps may aid cognitive function as we age

Written by Robby Berman on February 3, 2021 — Fact checked by Alexandra Sanfins, Ph.D.

  • A study of older adults in China finds a clear association between brief afternoon naps and stronger cognitive function.

  • Short, less frequent naps — lasting less than 30 minutes, four times a week — may be the most helpful.

Sleep patterns often change as we age, with many older people adding an afternoon snooze to their daily schedule. The meaning of such naps has been unclear: Do they help keep the mind agile, or do they signify incipient dementia? A new study may have the answer.

Older people who take afternoon naps score more highly on cognitive tests than their non-snoozing contemporaries. These nappers exhibit stronger cognitive function, including memory, orientation, and language.

This study, which appears in General Psychiatry, is the first to explore the relationship of napping to cognitive function and biochemistry in older populations.

 

Why this matters: Disturbed sleep linked to dementia

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Doctor taking blood pressure of older patient

OPENING HOURS

Mon, Tue, Thu: 9am - 6pm

Wed: 9am - 7pm
Sat: 9am - 3pm
Sun: Closed

 
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